Gold Mines in California

Gold Mining Claims for Sale in California

For Sale - gold Mines in California - We have spectacular 20 acre mining claims in California. Depending on the time of the year. We typically head down to California in the fall, winter and spring months to claim mines, which means the best chance of getting a mine in California is early winter through late spring. If we currently don't have any gold mines in California feel free to check out our other mines in the Western United States.

California is well known for it's  Gold Rush of 1848 which started when James W. Marshall found gold at Sutter's Mill in Coloma, California. Prospectors began flooding the state by the thousands. The Gold Rush lasted 7 years and brought 300,000 people to California. The impact of the Gold Rush was substantial. San Francisco grew from a small settlement of about 200 residents to a boomtown of about 36,000 by 1852. The Gold Rush paved the way for California to become a state. Gold, worth billions of dollars in today's money was recovered from gold mines in California during the great Gold Rush. For specific information about mining districts in California please refer to the National Bureau of Mines website.

Current Mining Claims in the Western United States

Arizona

  • Snyder Gold Mine – 20 acre lode claim – Tucson, Arizona

    Snyder Gold Mine – 20 acre lode claim – Tucson, Arizona

    The Snyder Mines are a very old, and very large complex of mines in the southern section of Arizona. The Snyder is one of those rare sites where native gold and horn silver occur in the same ore bodies in substantial quantities. This equates to a land fall for today's miners. The ores can be easily crushed to extract the free milling gold and break off a little horn silver while you are at it.

    $48,000.00
  • Worlds Fair Gold Mine – Lode & Placer claims – Patagonia, Arizona

    Worlds Fair Gold Mine – Lode & Placer claims – Patagonia, Arizona

    The Worlds Fair Mine is one of the largest mines located in southern Arizona it's also one of the richest with documented reserves of gold and silver. By 1915 the property is reported to have produced more than $1,000,000, of which over $500,000 was in high-grade ore. $1,000,000, and $500,000 in today's value would be $23,060,667.80 and $11,530,333.90 respectively.

    $80,000.00

Colorado

Idaho

Montana

Nevada

  • Tiger Lily Gold Mine – 20 acre lode Claim – Winnemucca, Nevada

    Tiger Lily Gold Mine – 20 acre lode Claim – Winnemucca, Nevada

    The Tiger Lily Claim is a collection of a well known shaft, a collapsed adit and a few small prospects. The shaft is known as the Rabbit Hole and is known enough to have the district named after it. The mining district is relatively flat and while thousands of ounces of placer nuggets have been recovered, the source mines are few and far between.

  • East Range Gold Mine -40 acre lode claims – Lovelock, Nevada

    East Range Gold Mine -40 acre lode claims – Lovelock, Nevada

    The East Range Gold Mine is all that you could want or ask from a high quality, Nevada gold mine. The site is very remote and rarely visited or seen. The claims cover 40 acres and are divided into the north and south claims. The claims cover the lower edge of a small knoll with exposed gold ores. These ores have been identified and gold has been produced from the site.

    $55,000.00

New Mexico

  • Christmas Tree Gold Mine – 20 acre lode claim – Lordsburg, New Mexico

    Christmas Tree Gold Mine – 20 acre lode claim – Lordsburg, New Mexico

    The Christmas Tree Mine has been historically worked for the native gold that the area is known for. The claim covers 2 large decline shafts and a group of prospects. The mines were located in roughly 1870, some work was done from 1870-1880, and $10,000.00 in gold was reported. Indian raids were the main cause of the abandonment of the workings.

Oregon

Utah

Wyoming

How Gold Formed in California

The gold deposits that are presently found in California are the work of millions of years of  plate tectonics. Millions of years ago pieces of what is presently know as California lay at the bottom of the ocean. Underwater volcanoes deposited lava which contained minerals (including gold) onto the sea floor. Between 400 million and 200 million years ago, geologic movement forced the sea floor eastwards, colliding with the North American continent, which was moving westwards.

Beginning about 200 million years ago, tectonic pressure forced the sea floor beneath the American continental mass. As it sank beneath today's California, the sea floor heated and melted into very large molten masses (magma). This magma was hotter than the continental crust above it, and consequently forced its way upward, cooling as it rose to become the granite rock found throughout the Sierra Nevada and other mountains in California today — such as the walls and domes of Yosemite Valley. As the hot magma cooled, solidified, and came in contact with water, minerals with similar melting temperatures tended to concentrate themselves together. As it solidified, gold became concentrated within the magma, and during this cooling process, veins of gold formed within fields of quartz because of the similar melting temperatures of both.

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